Children of Light: Live for the Holidays!

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 Holiday Sale!

Children of Light will be on sale through midnight December 26, 2017

Kindle 99 cents

Paperback $5.99

Poetry of the spirit

Reviews

Mary Clark has brought us an achingly beautiful chain of poems that both watch and listen: the sun, the sea, the darkness, the light, the passing of time—and the people who live among them.
Reverend Barbara Crafton, Episcopal priest and author

and:

As we know, poetry remains the best way to communicate our most fundamental ideas. In Children of Light, a modern tale of adversity and transcendence set in the unique natural environment and human history of Florida’s Gulf Coast, three children go on a journey that leads them to explore their true characters, their relationship to one another, and to society. 

The children’s journey, set in modern times, deals with questions of good and evil and how we can be guided by those who generate light. The author believes we can learn to exercise and develop our innate goodness, and in this tale, she shows how this can happen.

Reading this fascinating story told in poetic form to find out is a truly rewarding experience that one won’t easily forget.
— Bradford Dov Lewis, for the Liberal Minyan of Hell’s Kitchen/Chelsea, NYC

Kindle ebook of Children of Light, a poetry novel

Paperback of Children of Light

BardPress/Ten Penny Players

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Books for Christmas!

Two of my books in Kindle format are on sale NOW through DECEMBER 26

RACING THE SUN and CHILDREN OF LIGHT

And that’s not all – these can be combined with the paperback – when you buy a print copy of Racing The Sun, you get the Kindle for FREE. The print copy of Children of Light is only $5.99, with the Kindle at .99. Great deals!

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Without The Veil Between: Anne Brontë – Book Review

Without The Veil Between

Without The Veil Between Paperback

Without The Veil Between Kindle

Early in Diane Denton’s book the young curate, William Weightman, says to Anne Brontë: “You must find such satisfaction in being able to capture those moments the rest of us let slip away and sometimes aren’t aware of to begin with.” This is an essential part of Denton’s own gift. With this ability she is able to enter the world of a shy artist who lived in the shadows of her father, brother, and sisters, and in the light of a determined and insightful intellect. Anne Brontë set herself a more difficult task than her famous sisters, Charlotte and Emily. She was on a course of an artist whose subject was her life. Making this even more difficult, she sought to achieve emotional and mental stability.

Denton shows us the tensions in the austere home of the Reverend Brontë, the hopes for and disappointment in his drunken son, Branwell, and the longings of the three sisters for a more fulfilling life. The sisters’ books are populated with people who live large lives, with secret loves, deception, greed, passion, and loyalty. In this setting, quiet Anne makes her own way, exploring human relationships with a keen sense of morality and ethics. As a governess she has to be with people all day, at their beck and call, and can barely aspire to more. But as a true Brontë, she does aspire. Brief moments with the young curate open her heart to the possibility of love. And she dreams of opening a school with her sisters, and being in charge of her own life. William’s sudden death from cholera plunges her into depression, but she concentrates on duty and endurance, and calls on her faith.

On return to her father’s home, Anne witnesses Branwell’s descent into drugs, sexual escapades, and fantasy. Denton writes, “To reside within the dissolution of principles and proper behavior without being party to it meant that constant vigilance was required, which left little time or inclination for make-believe.” Anne realizes she will never be comfortable at home, able to escape into her writing as Emily has. She believes she will never be useful in society or at home unless she pursues a “well-cultivated mind and well-disposed heart,” and “have the strength to help others be strong.” Denton indicates these are the real-world issues she explores in her writing.

Denton builds the story of Anne’s young life gradually, taking us through her thoughts and experiences as she matures. The tempo steps up with the three sisters together again at Haworth, after having been separated for a few years. Charlotte has an idea for a book of poetry featuring all of them. Emily balks, and Anne mediates between the two, securing Emily’s participation. I found this one of the most fascinating parts of the book. The dynamics among these three gifted women sizzles on the page. Descriptions of Charlotte and Emily are haunting in their excellence. Each woman changed literature and the way in which women were viewed in society. Anne’s The Tenant of Wildfell Hall has been called one of the first feminist novels.

The book roars through the tragedies of Branwell’s and Emily’s deaths from consumption. Through all of this Anne faces reality with determination. She has come to believe she was meant to be “an observer, and given … a quiet skill to extract lessons from what she saw. There was truth to be told, warnings to be issued, patience and prudence to instill in young women.” She depicted people and society with realism, not romanticism. This book made me wonder what Anne Brontë’s influence would have been had she lived to reach full maturity. Sadly, she died soon after her sister, Emily.

In Without The Veil Between, Denton’s writing has reached its maturity as well. I kept copying excerpts and pasting them in a file for me to read, enjoy, and think about later. Whole passages are beautifully written: meticulous, poetic, luminous, and powerful. The ending, echoing the title, is especially brilliant. I can’t think of anyone better suited to bring us into the world and the life of the sensitive, creative, and quietly courageous Anne Brontë.

Visit Diane Denton’s blog

Writers of the Lost Art – Guest Post by, Annette Rochelle Aben …

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

When was the last time you received a letter in the mail? No, I don’t mean the ones like I receive, informing me of the great opportunity to settle my final arrangements before my family is burdened with the responsibility. Life can begin at any age but it gets fun once you turn 60. But I digress…

I was raised to write letters. Every time I received a gift, I wrote a thank you note. If I was having a party, I created invitations. When I wanted to communicate with a friend who had moved away from the neighborhood, I sent letters. Partly because there was NO privacy on the family phone, that hung in the kitchen, right around the corner from the living room. At least there was a hope that only the intended would be reading my letters. It was just what we did. And it was…

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The Pacey Style of Life: Racing The Sun

Racing The Sun Book Cover Small (2)

This short novel has a pacey style, which re-introduces ‘old’ characters with subtle reminders, and admirably handles current social themes.  – David Selzer

#fakenews #rumors #betrayal #familysecrets #DNAmatches #Cuba #Latinos #Jewish #Gay #Disabled #Teachers #Cars #Accidents #Cults #Non-Profits #Politics #Aliens

Mary Paperback Back Cover Small

Will Leila take the wheel to control the speed and direction of her work, and her life?

Racing The Sun is available on Amazon and Smashwords

   Racing The Sun on Amazon                                   Racing The Sun on Smashwords

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Veteran’s Day Book Special

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From November 11 through November 30, when you buy a copy of Enemy Skies: An Airman’s Story,  all proceeds will go to the Mighty Eighth Air Force Museum.

Duty, courage, fear and bravery are words known by soldiers in battle. In World War II, Americans joined the fight against Hitler and his cruel regime. These soldiers, when face to face with the highly organized, technologically efficient enemy, learned the meanings of other words—brutality and wastefulness.

Available in Paperback and Kindle ebook

J TALK

Great American music

The Observation Post

Let’s talk a bit about the “J” ladies who will join us on this 9th walk into my feminine song series. Our stroll starts with a century-old blues, the title of which has origins lost in haze beyond where the crow flies. Speculation has it that the Crow in the title refers to racist Jim Crow laws in Southern states in those vestigial days, or to the name of a Native American tribe, but no one seems to know for sure. In any case, CROW JANE is a ‘blues J’ that’s a jewel of its genre, performed here New Orleans street-style:

Next, we have a sweet little number from 1930. You’ll love her when you see….

I don’t know about you — I could go for more of this gal. But enough walking. This time, we’ll go by Cab (the fare is quite good):

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October Reflections

Voices from the Margins

Carol A. Hand

As I greet the morning facing east
the rising sun is momentarily visible
between the tree-lined horizon
and the bank of clouds moving in
Multicolored leaves provide a filter
allowing light and shadow to dance
highlighting gardens and dew-laden grass
The cool pine-scented gentle breeze
kisses my face and graying hair
and sets the wind chimes singing
Rustling leaves on trees join with their own music
Wind-blown crispy fallen leaves clicking on pavement
add counterpoint to the murmur of city traffic
I wish I could share the moment with others
But of course my camera is inside

I stop to wonder
What is this perceived need to share really about?
It’s becoming more and more difficult to blog
Perhaps it’s because it’s harder and harder to hope
Perhaps it’s because my inner reserves are depleted
by so much suffering in the world
and the myopic selfishness so…

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Halloween Literary Trick or Treat

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Here they come! Oh no, no zombies! No vampires! No children with special gifts! What is happening? Modern writers doing something new? Disruptive! Wait, I see a Pirate, a Ninja, a Power Ranger, Moana and Wonder Woman. Pop culture over-ride!

Here you are, kids. Paranormal romance. Ha ha, freaks you out? Me too! Every romance is paranormal. We fall in love with an idealized version of the other person, then reality sets in. We’re left with a Ghost of Expectations Past. That’s paranormal enough for me.

More kids in costumes, one carrying his pumpkin head and another a pumpkin spice poison latte corroding fake fingers. Here’s a sprinkling of excessive victimhood, courtesy of Oprah. The whole kitchen sink of abuse is in each one of these stories! Creeps you out? Me too!

Wow, more kids, but these look like teens. I have something for you – dystopian fiction. Okay, I know dystopia is already here. And while we still have our basic necessities and most of our comforts, forces (Congress, for instance) are working on taking away those toot sweet. It’s not #fakenews that 1984 came and never went away. I agree, smart mouth, what we need now is for someone to write, How To Survive Dystopia.

Scared? Me too.

(For more cool pumpkin ideas, visit Country Living)