“Diversity”: Poem by Bette A. Stevens

Bette A. Stevens, Maine Author

Diversity

by Bette A. Stevens

Splendor of countless pigments
In gardens they combine
Echoing grandiose harmony
Serenity you’ll find

And so it is with people
Of every thought and hue
Diversity’s resplendency
Reflecting me and you

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Review: “Unyielding: Love and Resistance in WW2 Germany (World War II Trilogy)by Marion Kummerow”

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Unyielding: Love and Resistance in WW2 Germany (World War II Trilogy) by [Kummerow, Marion]I read and reviewed the first part in this trilogy “Unrelenting” on this blog and interviewed Marion as well.

Finally I managed to catch up with the series and find out where the story takes our protagonists.

The novel begins with the wedding of intelligence agent Wilhelm Quedlin to Hilde Dremmer in 1936. “Q”, as WIlhelm is called, is part of the resistance against Hitler, but things become more tricky as the Nazi power grip intensifies.

Their honeymoon to Italy is somewhat cut short when the political developments in Europe and Germany catch up with them and force them back into the resistance work.

The book focuses much on the romance and feelings between the couple as well as on the historical aspects. The characters are easy to engage with and the difficulties and dangers of resistance work are well researched and documented. On the shorter side of a novel…

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NEW RELEASE – ‘Enemy Skies’ by Forrest S. Clark

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

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Duty, courage, fear and bravery are words known by soldiers in battle.

In World War II, Americans joined the fight against Hitler and his cruel regime.

These soldiers, when face to face with the highly organized, technologically efficient enemy, learned the meanings of other words—brutality and wastefulness.

Forrest S. Clark was a young B24 gunner and radio operator who flew with the 8th Air Force, 67th Squadron, 44th Bomb Group, known as “The Flying Eightballs,” in the European Theater.

He witnessed fiery deaths in the skies over Germany, heard the click-click of the bombs dropping, and saw the fires in the cities below.

Some of the airmen who died, or were listed as MIA, had become friends.

In April 1944, he was on a mission to Lechfeld Air Base, near Dachau, south of Augsburg, when his B24 was hit in the fuel tank.

Pursued by German fighters, the pilot turned…

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The tip of the iceberg

Letters from Athens

A few days ago I had lunch with a friend who is very involved in the refugee crisis, since she works with the European official in charge. They had come to Greece in order to meet with various members of the Greek government and to visit  Lesvos (they had previously stopped by Lampedusa). The things she told me make for scary reading.

Firstly, the measures decided upon – after much debate – are simply not working.  The relocation project dependant on ‘hot spots’  being set up to process people is proving ineffective, even as Greece is asking for €480 million to implement it (less than six have been approved so far). The reason is the following:
Refugees must go to the nearest hot spot to be fingerprinted and given identity papers; then they will have to wait until they are sent to the country they are allocated to. This might take months, given the…

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COMPASSION a poem by Bette A. Stevens

Bette A. Stevens, Maine Author

compassion-poem-bas-2017Compassion is…

Compassion in life is a beautiful thing. But exactly what is compassion? I’ve always thought of compassion as love in action. After writing the poem COMPASSION, I searched Google to find a definition. The synonyms fit perfectly into my preconceived notion for the poem because they not only included love and mercy, each synonym requires action (stirring) on our part to metamorphose the ideaof compassion into the realty of compassion.

May compassion reign in our hearts and hands.

~ Bette A. Stevens

Google Search:

com·pas·sion
kəmˈpaSHən/

noun: compassion; plural noun: compassions

sympathetic pity and concern for the sufferings or misfortunes of others.

“the victims should be treated with compassion”

synonyms: pity, sympathy, empathy, fellow feeling, care, concern, solicitude, sensitivity, warmth, love, tenderness, mercy, leniency, tolerance, kindness, humanity, charity

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Learning as You Write – Guest Post…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

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Writers are advised by editors, agents, academic and self-appointed experts to write about what they know. Some people have pointed out that would be boring. As writers we live in a world of imagination. Some tend to exaggerate, or have a quirky point of view, but many of us simply wonder what’s beyond the known world. We daydream, pay close attention to and analyze our sensory experience, and experiment with ideas. In other words, we go beyond the bounds of ordinary existence. In a way our characters are avatars for ourselves as we explore a made-up world, one created from what we know and what we are curious to know.

When I wrote Miami Morning, I broke the rule on writing what you know. Instead, I was fascinated by what I could learn about topics that were new to me. As I wrote, for instance, I was challenged, just…

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Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT MIAMI MORNING by Mary Clark @mceyes #WomensFiction

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Today’s team review is from E.L Lindley, she blogs at http://lindleyreviews.blogspot.co.uk/

#RBRT Review Team

E.L. has been reading Miami Morning by Mary Clark

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Miami Morning by Mary Clark is the story of idealistic teacher Leila Payson. It’s a novel that affords the reader not only the opportunity to follow Leila on her journey through life but also offers a glimpse of what life is like working within the public schools’ system in Miami amid ever changing educational ideology and internal politics.

The novel begins on Leila’s 41st birthday, she is enjoying a comfortable existence having been a social studies’ teacher for fifteen years. However, her sense of peace is undermined as she begins to reflect back over her past. Clark uses Leila’s memories to draw the reader into her life as we are given an insight into key life changing events, such as the death of her mother.

A defining experience…

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2016 Election

I wrote this to some online friends in other countries:

You might be wondering about what is going on in the culture of the USA. For one thing, the Democrats have no one to blame but themselves – and I am one. We used to be the party of the working people. We cared about the working man and woman, and championed being able to improve the quality of life for them, and for all Americans.

More than 20 years ago companies began moving to other countries and leaving many towns and some cities without an economic base. We did nothing, and the Republicans did nothing – until this election cycle when one person saw the anger and resentment at being marginalized and tapped into it. Democrats talked about creating jobs, lowering taxes on the middle class, and making education more affordable, but their one big idea was to raise the minimum wage. As if everyone’s working at Walmart or a fast food place. What people want is good paying jobs, real jobs. Instead of thinking about electing the first woman president, Democrats needed to be thinking – as they used to do – about poverty and the dignity of work. The Republican leadership didn’t get it, either, so they missed the Trump Train. 

Hillary Clinton, the Democratic candidate and her husband and staff, came off as elitist insiders and that only fueled more anger. Unfortunately, Trump infused his campaign with rhetoric that blames immigrants and Muslims for problems they have not caused, and this is a dangerous thing. He used the anger to stoke the flames of hate even higher. Today, many of those who felt they weren’t being listened to by the powers-that-be in Washington, D.C., feel vindicated, but they may also feel empowered to take revenge.

Both the right and the left in the US complained about the move into a global economy, noting that there were victims, mostly small businesses and working people. The Democrats had a candidate who was a strong voice for these concerns, but he lost in the primary. He won the “Rust Belt” states, though, and that along with what he was saying should have been a wake up call for the party.

I think many Democrats, and the Republican leadership, assumed their fellow Americans would never vote for a racist, sexist, foul-mouthed boor. They didn’t understand that the anger was so deep people would excuse or ignore, and even revel in, that behavior.

My biggest concerns about Donald Trump are: the blaming of specific ethnic and religious groups; racism; aggressive denial of free speech to those who disagree with him; ignorance about international relations; and his impetuosity. 

Writing: Patterns and Change – Guest Post…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Story Mapping

I have written memoirs and historical fiction before and tried my hand at short stories, but Miami Morning is my first novel. The mistakes became apparent to me as the book neared completion. What to do? Rearrange all the chapters? Write it again? Then there are those supporting characters. Are they playing a role or am I simply fond of them?

These questions refer to the creation of a coherent pattern, one that the reader will see as sensible and magical at the same time. I decided to work to make my mistakes comprehensible, and resolve not to make them again. Finally, I began to see the threads coming together. One of the fascinating experiences of writing is seeing a pattern emerge from the themes, ideas, and characters’ trajectories.

It was interesting as well to realize that my main character, Leila Payson, in bringing together the various threads in…

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