One Word

Andrew Joyce

I’ve been angry all my life. Everyone was always out to take from me. I’ve never had any friends. Even when I was in high school, the other kids would go out to lunch together while I sat by myself, just off the school grounds, and felt the loneliness that had become my life.

On Saturdays nights, the other kids would go out on dates or pile into a car for a night of adventure. I would hitchhike to the main drag, plant myself on a bus bench, and watch the world go by, wishing I was a part of it.

Things didn’t get much better after I became an adult. I existed in the world, but was not a part of it. I had no use for anybody. My loneliness had long ago morphed into hatred. Hatred for the whole damn human race.

Then one day, I saw a…

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MYRTLE THE PURPLE TURTLE: A BOOK REVIEW

Annika Perry's Writing Blog

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‘Myrtle the Purple Turtle’ is one of the most striking, original children’s books released in recent years.

I was immediately drawn in by the welcoming cover of Myrtle proudly striding along and quickly became engaged with this wonderful character.

As a purple turtle, Myrtle has never considered herself any different from the other turtles and is happy and confident in her life. Until one day a rude turtle laughs and taunts her for even daring to consider herself a turtle.

What follows next is a touching and tender story to which we can all relate when faced with inconsiderate hurtful comments. As Myrtle sets out on a journey of self-discovery and understanding…with some help from her mother and friends along the way, she learns to accept herself and others.

I quickly lost myself within Myrtle’s world and empathised with her hurt and confusion … cheering her on as this feisty…

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New Things

Jo Robinson

Busy Birds Busy Birdies

After this past year of epic chaos interestingness, I am happy to say that  I have learned a lot, and strangely, even the really unpleasant lessons are now showing me their value – retrospect is a fine thing indeed. Now, tempered to the strength of old boots, while hopefully not looking too much like one of them, I am happy to say that there is quite a lot of fabulousness to come over the next few weeks. Beginning with the epic launch in the next weeks of the beginning of her public life, Cynthia Reyes’ amazing Myrtle the Purple Turtle, closely followed by some unadulterated genius of science-fiction by the one and only Joelle LeGendre there is a lot coming up – all happy and wonderful beginnings from some very talented people.

I’ve made sure this time, that failing the actual end of the world…

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Fall Sneaks In

Regina Puckett

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Regina Puckett

 

Lighting bonfires amid falling leaves

Wearing sweaters and flannel sleeves

Roasting marshmallows and hotdogs

Hearing the north wind asking for fireplace logs

Watching Trick or Treaters bring in the frost

As the Headless Horseman seeks what was lost

Our hot summer slips away and fall sneaks in

While we carve out our pumpkin’s sly grin

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To learn to live, finally

angelaroothaan

After a long day I went to sit outside for a bit, and I watched the stars. Reflecting on the moment and on my life as it is now, a sentence came to my head: ‘I am just living my life and enjoying it.’ It was a humble thought, not a triumphant one. And then, this sentence of Derrida, which had vexed me for years ‘to learn to live, finally’ came to my head. I cite from the head now, but it is from his Specters of Marx, which I read for the first time about seven years ago. Upon my first read this book fascinated me, as it gave me so much new insights into the world we are living in right now. Published in its English version in 1994 (French 1993), the book foresightedly analyzes the post-Cold-War world, which was fresh and new back then, but of…

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My Review of Rusticles by Rebecca Gransden for #RBRT

This sounds interesting

Judith Barrow

rusticlesI was given this book of short stories by the author as a member of Rosie Amber’s Review Team #RBRT in return for an honest review.

I gave this book 3* out of 5*

Book Blurb:

In Hilligoss, a tired man searches for a son, a flamingo enthrals the night, and fireworks light up the lost. In these stories and more, Rusticles offers a meandering tour through backroads bathed in half light, where shadows play along the verges and whispers of the past assault daydreams of the present. Walk the worn pathways of Hilligoss.

My Review:

I am unfamiliar with this author’s work so the first time I read each story two thoughts struck me: they are unique in that they are written in an oblique style difficult to grasp initially; much is implied within phrases and partial , seemingly unfinished dialogue. And secondly, that  these tales are almost poetic prose…

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Where Has Conversation Gone?

Something to talk about, and we should – I wish it could be more person to person rather than soc media

BronxBeyondBorders

© 2016 E. R. Smith All Rights Reserved

img_0865 Millennials keep earphones on all day long. They rarely detach.

Where Has Conversation Gone?

There was a time, not long ago, when people spoke with one another.  Conversation was a wonderful way to know who your neighbors were, what’s the newest news on the block, it was comforting.  Yes, conversation was a bit nosy and intrusive, however it seems to have kept us safer…more connected.  Conversation began in childhood, we spoke to our friends on the playground.  We organized who would turn or jump for double-dutch.  We looked at one another as we spoke, to learn what the twitches and expressions our friend’s face meant. We put the verbiage together with facial changes to sense a deeper meaning.  We stared unblinkingly at our partner’s eyes to assure that our chants and hands were synchronized during “Miss Mary Mack”.  Adults encouraged conversation as…

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Railing

Elan Muldrow is an amazingly good poet!

Elan Mudrow

Who is the ghost that walks the train?

The apparition tugs on our shirt sleeves

But all rides are displaced

We are logged into otherness,

Password protected

Our faces dug deep into ourselves

Reflections fed to us

Wires from out our ears

Wi-Fi, stuck in our gut

Download speeds of the central nervous system.

Our spines reverberate myriads of chatter.

A silent rustle, instilling itself

Convincing us without us ever knowing

How important we are compared to

All other representations of knowing

While we are in the midst of knowing.

It’s called automatic updates

The train moves automatically

We are in a moving bubble…..and

From the windows see sprawl

Hurling past us………………tame trees

Surly lawns, hybrid bushes

Dotted between office buildings

Who give out loans, advice, and massages,

Fast food made to look like good food

Good food made to look like fast food

We look to make it home…

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“Diversity”: Poem by Bette A. Stevens

Bette A. Stevens, Maine Author

Diversity

by Bette A. Stevens

Splendor of countless pigments
In gardens they combine
Echoing grandiose harmony
Serenity you’ll find

And so it is with people
Of every thought and hue
Diversity’s resplendency
Reflecting me and you

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Review: “Unyielding: Love and Resistance in WW2 Germany (World War II Trilogy)by Marion Kummerow”

writerchristophfischer

Unyielding: Love and Resistance in WW2 Germany (World War II Trilogy) by [Kummerow, Marion]I read and reviewed the first part in this trilogy “Unrelenting” on this blog and interviewed Marion as well.

Finally I managed to catch up with the series and find out where the story takes our protagonists.

The novel begins with the wedding of intelligence agent Wilhelm Quedlin to Hilde Dremmer in 1936. “Q”, as WIlhelm is called, is part of the resistance against Hitler, but things become more tricky as the Nazi power grip intensifies.

Their honeymoon to Italy is somewhat cut short when the political developments in Europe and Germany catch up with them and force them back into the resistance work.

The book focuses much on the romance and feelings between the couple as well as on the historical aspects. The characters are easy to engage with and the difficulties and dangers of resistance work are well researched and documented. On the shorter side of a novel…

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