Children of Light: Live for the Holidays!

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 Extended Holiday Sale!

Children of Light will be on sale through midnight January 10, 2018

Kindle 99 cents

Paperback $5.99

Poetry of the spirit

Reviews

Mary Clark has brought us an achingly beautiful chain of poems that both watch and listen: the sun, the sea, the darkness, the light, the passing of time—and the people who live among them.
Reverend Barbara Crafton, Episcopal priest and author

and:

As we know, poetry remains the best way to communicate our most fundamental ideas. In Children of Light, a modern tale of adversity and transcendence set in the unique natural environment and human history of Florida’s Gulf Coast, three children go on a journey that leads them to explore their true characters, their relationship to one another, and to society. 

The children’s journey, set in modern times, deals with questions of good and evil and how we can be guided by those who generate light. The author believes we can learn to exercise and develop our innate goodness, and in this tale, she shows how this can happen.

Reading this fascinating story told in poetic form to find out is a truly rewarding experience that one won’t easily forget.
— Bradford Dov Lewis, for the Liberal Minyan of Hell’s Kitchen/Chelsea, NYC

Kindle ebook of Children of Light, a poetry novel

Paperback of Children of Light

BardPress/Ten Penny Players

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Veteran’s Day Book Special

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From November 11 through November 30, when you buy a copy of Enemy Skies: An Airman’s Story,  all proceeds will go to the Mighty Eighth Air Force Museum.

Duty, courage, fear and bravery are words known by soldiers in battle. In World War II, Americans joined the fight against Hitler and his cruel regime. These soldiers, when face to face with the highly organized, technologically efficient enemy, learned the meanings of other words—brutality and wastefulness.

Available in Paperback and Kindle ebook

J TALK

Great American music

The Observation Post

Let’s talk a bit about the “J” ladies who will join us on this 9th walk into my feminine song series. Our stroll starts with a century-old blues, the title of which has origins lost in haze beyond where the crow flies. Speculation has it that the Crow in the title refers to racist Jim Crow laws in Southern states in those vestigial days, or to the name of a Native American tribe, but no one seems to know for sure. In any case, CROW JANE is a ‘blues J’ that’s a jewel of its genre, performed here New Orleans street-style:

Next, we have a sweet little number from 1930. You’ll love her when you see….

I don’t know about you — I could go for more of this gal. But enough walking. This time, we’ll go by Cab (the fare is quite good):

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October Reflections

Voices from the Margins

Carol A. Hand

As I greet the morning facing east
the rising sun is momentarily visible
between the tree-lined horizon
and the bank of clouds moving in
Multicolored leaves provide a filter
allowing light and shadow to dance
highlighting gardens and dew-laden grass
The cool pine-scented gentle breeze
kisses my face and graying hair
and sets the wind chimes singing
Rustling leaves on trees join with their own music
Wind-blown crispy fallen leaves clicking on pavement
add counterpoint to the murmur of city traffic
I wish I could share the moment with others
But of course my camera is inside

I stop to wonder
What is this perceived need to share really about?
It’s becoming more and more difficult to blog
Perhaps it’s because it’s harder and harder to hope
Perhaps it’s because my inner reserves are depleted
by so much suffering in the world
and the myopic selfishness so…

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Halloween Literary Trick or Treat

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Here they come! Oh no, no zombies! No vampires! No children with special gifts! What is happening? Modern writers doing something new? Disruptive! Wait, I see a Pirate, a Ninja, a Power Ranger, Moana and Wonder Woman. Pop culture over-ride!

Here you are, kids. Paranormal romance. Ha ha, freaks you out? Me too! Every romance is paranormal. We fall in love with an idealized version of the other person, then reality sets in. We’re left with a Ghost of Expectations Past. That’s paranormal enough for me.

More kids in costumes, one carrying his pumpkin head and another a pumpkin spice poison latte corroding fake fingers. Here’s a sprinkling of excessive victimhood, courtesy of Oprah. The whole kitchen sink of abuse is in each one of these stories! Creeps you out? Me too!

Wow, more kids, but these look like teens. I have something for you – dystopian fiction. Okay, I know dystopia is already here. And while we still have our basic necessities and most of our comforts, forces (Congress, for instance) are working on taking away those toot sweet. It’s not #fakenews that 1984 came and never went away. I agree, smart mouth, what we need now is for someone to write, How To Survive Dystopia.

Scared? Me too.

(For more cool pumpkin ideas, visit Country Living)

 

A Moment of War – Book Review

A Moment of WarLaurie Lee’ s evocative, authentic voice rings across time to bring us into a pivotal moment of the 20th Century. Spain is at war with itself, but that war is also the spark that signifies the beginning of a greater tragedy. How insidious are the cold-blooded calculations and miscalculations that led to World War II! 

In A Moment of War, the young British idealist, Laurie Lee, sets out to revisit and defend the country he came to know a few years before while on a long rambling excursion into the heights and depths of Spain, described in his previous book, As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning. 

As he writes of his solitary and stubborn trek over the Pyrenees: “I was at that flush of youth which never doubts self-survival, that idiot belief in luck and a uniquely charmed life, without which illusion few wars would be possible. I felt the seal of fate on me, and a certain grim intoxication, alone in this buried silence.”

What he finds is confusion, people appearing to be what they’re not, hunger, cold, and random brutality. The international volunteers are not trained and not armed. They are held in desolate places, starving and suffering from the cold and boredom. Every so often a speaker rallies them and they raise their fists, ready to fight and die in the fight against Fascism. Lee underscored the absurdity of the situation, and its likely uselessness, as he said: “Did we know, as we stood there, our clenched fists raised high, our torn coats flapping in the wind, and scarcely a gun between the three of us, that we had ranged against us the rising military power of Europe, the soft evasions of our friends, and the deadly cynicism of Russia?”

He saw this and yet: “But in our case, I believe, we shared something else, unique to us at that time – the chance to make one grand, uncomplicated gesture of personal sacrifice and faith which might never occur again. Certainly, it was the last time this century that a generation had such an opportunity before the fog of nationalism and mass slaughter closed in.”

The savagery of modern technological war caught the Spanish government by surprise. Franco, who led the rebels, and was allied with Hitler and Mussolini, had no qualms about letting them use Spain as a testing ground: “Then there the firebombs, calculated, dropped on the old town and the poor. The Luftwaffe was clinical. Franco had said that he was willing to wipe Madrid from the earth rather than let it remain ‘in the hands of the Marxists’ so he gave it up to Luftwaffe.”

In the end, after months of hardship, Lee is taken on a wild ride to the front, when the war has turned in Franco’s favor, and many are getting out or getting what they can. He finds himself dumped, with a few others, with no idea where he is or where the enemy is. While he and a Russian and a girl try to find shelter, several men come toward them. A short struggle ensues. Lee takes the rebel soldier’s weapon, shoots and kills him. He then runs away with the few stragglers. On his way out of Spain, he wonders: “Was this then what I’d come for, and all my journey had meant – to smudge out the life of an unknown young man in a blur of panic which in no way could affect victory or defeat?”

Before he left Spain, he was arrested as a suspected spy, for the third time, and jailed again. Each time he was thrown into terrible conditions, the first time in a pit, and the last time in a filthy prison with crowded cells. Each time he is saved at the last moment by someone who recognizes him and has the authority to free him. Twice he is close to being executed before this happens. This is a story of war’s senselessness, subversion and exhaustion of human feeling.

The last time he is saved by Bill Rust, the editor of the Daily Worker, who gave him the task of sorting cards with the names and addresses of five or six hundred British and Irish volunteers. “Many – more than half – were marked ‘killed in action’ or ‘missing,’ at such fronts as Brunete, Jarama and Guadalajara. Public schoolboys, undergraduates, men from coal mines and mills, they were the ill-armed advance scouts in the, as yet, unsanctified Second World War. Here were the names of dead heroes, piled into little cardboard boxes, never to be inscribed later in official Halls of Remembrance. Without recognition, often ridiculed, they saw what was coming, jumped the gun, and went into battle too soon.”

This is the review of A Moment of War on Amazon.

One Word

Andrew Joyce

I’ve been angry all my life. Everyone was always out to take from me. I’ve never had any friends. Even when I was in high school, the other kids would go out to lunch together while I sat by myself, just off the school grounds, and felt the loneliness that had become my life.

On Saturdays nights, the other kids would go out on dates or pile into a car for a night of adventure. I would hitchhike to the main drag, plant myself on a bus bench, and watch the world go by, wishing I was a part of it.

Things didn’t get much better after I became an adult. I existed in the world, but was not a part of it. I had no use for anybody. My loneliness had long ago morphed into hatred. Hatred for the whole damn human race.

Then one day, I saw a…

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MYRTLE THE PURPLE TURTLE: A BOOK REVIEW

Annika Perry's Writing Blog

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‘Myrtle the Purple Turtle’ is one of the most striking, original children’s books released in recent years.

I was immediately drawn in by the welcoming cover of Myrtle proudly striding along and quickly became engaged with this wonderful character.

As a purple turtle, Myrtle has never considered herself any different from the other turtles and is happy and confident in her life. Until one day a rude turtle laughs and taunts her for even daring to consider herself a turtle.

What follows next is a touching and tender story to which we can all relate when faced with inconsiderate hurtful comments. As Myrtle sets out on a journey of self-discovery and understanding…with some help from her mother and friends along the way, she learns to accept herself and others.

I quickly lost myself within Myrtle’s world and empathised with her hurt and confusion … cheering her on as this feisty…

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Racing The Sun: Goodreads Giveaway – Update!

From October 8 to October 22, 2017, you can enter a Goodreads Giveaway to win one of five print copies of Racing The Sun, Volume 2 of the Leila Payson Series. 

The giveaway has ended and I’m thrilled to find the winners live in very different parts of the country, from Florida to Michigan to Utah. I thank my fellow peeps who reblogged or tweeted about this giveaway. Stay tuned for a Christmas sale!

Racing The Sun Paperback Cover Small

Vintage cars, wheelchair races, love tours. Secret lives, sisters, and suspense. Family disruption and a friend’s unexplained absence. Big tent meetings, bringing together people of varying dis/abilties. Romance gay and straight. A trip to Africa, and a quest for flamingos. Leila and her friends are back with more adventures in Racing The Sun.

Book Cover by Chris Graham.