Human Beings are Rogue Agents of Change

What if we are all in a dream, and it is just a phase, a phase that must not be interrupted, but allowed to run its course, or the promise will be unfulfilled? That’s the idea that informs Waking God, Book 1, by Philip F. Harris and Brian L. Doe, All Things That Matter Press. The main characters, Andrew and Mara, carry the godseed that can bring forth a new Being equal to or even greater than its Creator. “They shall be as gods, for that is their design. The dormant gene shall emerge.”

Harris and Doe give flesh and blood to this theme. Andrew, a professor, is on a quest: “To discover the unified secret, both lost and perhaps conspiratorially hidden, that lay behind man’s spiritual existence. If he could close the circle, science and religion would once again merge.”

Not only is there a conspiracy to keep Man from knowing, there is this impetus behind all scientific and spiritual search:

“If you knew the reason for everything as it happened, you would stagnate. Man is not yet all-knowing. If he were, there would be no purpose for any of this. Not having all the answers at one’s fingertips puts us on the path of discovery. It is how we evolve.”

“While physicists were exploring a more real world theory of a unified universe, Andrew felt that such a hypothesis would never truly answer all of life’s greatest questions. Intuitively, he knew that quarks, neutrinos, packets of photons, vibrating strings of energy, dark matter were but half of the “grand equation. …What was different, [Andrew] often queried, between the transcendental notion that an event in one part of the universe rippled throughout all of reality, and the current quantum string theory?”

In the search for “the unified secret,” all the cards in the deck are reshuffled. What has been promulgated as “good” is revealed to be an attempt to prevent human beings from waking from the dream-state and discovering their true potential. God is undefined, appearing to be an aloof and mystical causal agent (reminiscent of the Holy Ghost). While many of the traditions, organizations and symbols are Christian in this book, there are episodes where other spiritual traditions and religions come into the story.

If there is a divide between Man and God, what side would the angels be on? It turns out their loyalty would be divided, and a battle has been playing out since ancient times. What gives human beings hope that they will wake from the dream-state is the force of consciousness

Of interest to me is the notion that every human being is an agent of change. We are, I believe, not only agents of change, but rogue agents, a disrupting force in the universe. As disruptive causal agents, our influences and interactions can become disruptive causes in themselves. So the interactions may initiate series (are they chains?) of actions and reactions. We push the known limits of being and becoming. Some say this is to become more like our creator, attracted by unity; others that we will realize our full potential and become the equal of or greater than our creator.

Why would the god-principle create a force that could, once it wakes up, challenge all other forces or agents and even become dominant? One possible answer is that it would be natural for a causal agent to create more than harmonious effects or results (the Garden of Eden, for instance), but other causal agents (Adam and Eve). The god-principle, as the creator of all causal agents, is the greatest of them. But can this god-principle be subject to being overtaken by its own creations?

Our role in the universe may be to keep being and becoming alive, both by creating and developing and by breaking patterns or rearranging them, even to the extent of destroying (changing matter and energy in one form to another distinct form), or making chaotic what has become too stable. These are precipitating events, another theme of Waking God.

All the while, we view ourselves as rational beings, with a desire for order. Camus said rebellion, which is disruptive, was at base a call for unity, the most positive form of order.

In our quest to fully develop our potential, at some point, we will reach a level where transformation to a higher form takes place. In a sense our current condition is a dream state; we are not truly awake to what we are becoming, or could become.

It is this vision that Waking God explores.

Tally: An Intuitive Life

TALLYFRONT

Tally: An Intuitive Life, published by All Things That Matter Press

Available at Amazon/Kindle and BarnesandNoble.com/Nook

An unlikely friendship between a young woman and an elderly man becomes a journey into identity, aging, and the meaning of life. The young Erin Yes is intrigued by the 79 year-old Greenwich Village artist Paul Johnston (PJ).

Erin Yes, called Eyes and Eyart by PJ, learns of his early days in the 1920s Village, and his career as a fine printer, book designer and writer. But in mid-life, PJ tells her, he and his wife split up, and he fell ill. He died in the hospital, and accepted “this death as the fulfillment of a very great life.” To his consternation, he is brought back to life to find he is receiving a blood transfusion from his estranged wife.

After this “death and renascence” he realized he is a “ghost of the father, the husband, the printer” he had been. At the same time, he has been purged of all the guilt of his previous life. Still, he  is not a baby, but reborn or “re-based” in the skeleton of a man with the mind and memory of an adult. He has to re-identify himself and “find new reasons to live.” Over the years, he creates several identities: The Writer, The Artist, The Professor of Love, and The Old Man.

Throughout the second half of his life, he re-creates himself anew, each time returning to innocence. He begins to write a daily journal, tapping into several levels or layers of consciousness, where he finds “all the comprehensions and contradictions” of life. He evaluates his intent, motives and behavior, and in this way, is able to adjust his intuition so that he can act and react in an amiable and positive way.

Erin is intrigued by his concepts of intuition in life and art, of guilt and innocence, and the transforming role of consciousness. Erin and PJ’s friendship is an emotional and intellectual adventure, often testing the limits of their relationship. Erin comes to realize PJ is more than a teacher and friend.

Will you think of me, and love me,

As you did once long ago?

Review excerpts:

“Unexpectedly, I found myself very moved by the book’s ending, feeling the question: how can we be sure we have influenced someone as significantly as they have influenced us?” – Diane M. Denton, author of A House Near Luccoli

“PJ’s intellect and humor makes him an utterly fascinating subject. Some of his musings are brilliant; others, wildly off-the-wall. … It’s not a book you can race through, but one that will make you think a lot about how anyone assembles the flotsam of life into a coherent story. Lest you think PJ was some kind of eccentric and amusing kook, a chapter near the end will prove you wrong.” – Marylee MacDonald, author of Montpelier Tomorrow